The Family Photo Album: Lincoln School, 1930-1931

Below is a photo of Lucia Arras’s second grade class at Lincoln School in Findlay, Ohio.  It was taken in early spring, 1931.

1930-31

Lucia is visible just over her teacher’s shoulder in the light-colored dress.

The boys are wearing the typical outfit of the day: dress shirt, sweater and tie, knickerbockers and long woolen socks.  It wasn’t until they were older that most boys would graduate to long pants.

Of particular interest are the shoes worn by two young men in the front row:

1930-31 shoes

Look familiar?  They’re early Converse athletic shoes!  Within the next year or so, the Chuck Taylor name was added to the badge visible on the inner ankle.

converse ad 1931
Marion Star (Marion, Ohio), 9 Sep 1931, p 6 col 7.

At the time, a pair of these shoes cost about $1.101.  A loaf of bread cost roughly 7 cents and a pound of cheese, 20 cents2.

Several other children in Lucia’s class are recognizable when compared with her 6th grade photo.

Jeanne Anne Athey:

jeanne anne athey 1941
Jeanne Anne Athey in the Findlay High School yearbook, Class of 1941

James Quinlan:

james quinlan 1941
James Quinlan in the Findlay High School yearbook, Class of 1941

Twins, Marian and Mildred Saller.

Marian:

mildred and marian saller 1941
Marian Saller in the Findlay High School yearbook, Class of 1941

Mildred:

mildred and marian saller 1941
Mildred Saller in the Findlay High School yearbook, Class of 1941

Oddly, when the Arras family sold their home on Joy Avenue to move to 519 W. Lincoln, it was the Saller family that moved in!  Lucia always remembered the neighbors there at Joy Avenue, George and Minnie Gayer, with great fondness.  It was they who gave her her first (and only) doll.


1 Evening Independent (Massillon, OH), p 1, col 2
2 Brazil Daily Times (Brazil, IN), p 6, col 1 & col 6.

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The Family Photo Album: Bernice and Mary

Today’s photo is of my great-grandmother, Bernice (Kraus) Benington, wife of Ralph Benington whose WWI experiences are documented in this series.  Bernice is pictured standing outside her home at 420 Tiffin Avenue in Findlay, Ohio.  Above her, on the porch, is her mother, Mary Josephine (Groth) Kraus.

bernice and mary

Mary lived to a ripe old age.  Just recently, I found a newspaper article profiling her on the occasion of her 90th birthday:

Findlay Woman, 90 Today, Says Days, Years Go Faster The Older One Gets

By MARGARET DENNIS

“The older you get the faster the days and years go flying by,” Mrs. Mary Kraus, 138 Trenton Ave., commented yesterday. So it isn’t worrying her a bit that, although she will be 90 years old today, her birthday will not be celebrated until Sunday.

Her children are planning an open house from 2 to 5 o’clock Sunday afternoon in the home where Mrs. Kraus lived for 60 years and where all of her six children were born. Located on US 224 in Marion Township, it is now the home of one of her grandchildren, Mrs. Clyde King.

All of her six children, including two who live in Oklahoma, will be at the celebration. So will most of her 14 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Friends of the family are also expected during the afternoon to offer their congratulations.

Two of Mrs. Kraus’ daughters, Mrs. Malcolm (Glenna) McFarland and her husband and Mrs. Elton (Mabel) Rose and Mr. Rose are expected to arrive Saturday from their homes in Tulsa, Okla.

The other children, all of whom live in Findlay, are Mrs. Parker (Carrie) Ickes, Mrs. Bernice Bennington, Mrs. Virgil (Frances) Saltzman and Clarence Kraus, with whom Mrs. Kraus lives.

“After my husband John died in 1930, I gave up my home and tried living in an apartment but I felt so boxed up,” she explained. “Then I lived around with all of my children but that didn’t work, either. It seemed I hardly got settled in one place until it was time to go somewhere else. So, since last November I’ve been living here with my son and my children come and visit me. It’s a lot easier on me.”

Oldest of Seven

Mrs. Kraus is the oldest of seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. John Groth who came here from Germany. The family consisted of two daughters and five sons. Mrs. Kraus’ sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Russell, lives in Biglick Township. All of her brothers are dead except one — John Groth of Calypso, Mont.

“That’s the sad thing about living so long,” Mrs. Kraus said. “All my classmates at the old Wolfe School are gone, too, except Mrs. Effie Carter. I hope she can come to my party.”

Mrs. Kraus recalls wading through deep snow and mud many days to attend the little one room school. It was about a mile from her home.

She has been a Lutheran all her life, and believes she is the oldest member of Trinity Lutheran Church.

A lot of her time is spent crocheting.

“I’ve made scads of pot holders, pillow cases and covers for heating pads. My great-granddaughters have pillow cases I have made tucked away in their hope chests. I’ve crocheted better than a hundred rugs, too.”

She likes to make rugs better than any other crocheting she does, but admits they are getting a little heavy for her to handle. Her hands are badly crippled by arthritis but as she says, “I’m going to keep on crocheting as long as I possibly can. I think the exercise is good for my hands.”

Proud of Her Rugs

She is proud of her rugs. She makes all shapes and sizes but, “I can’t make them pretty if the rags aren’t pretty,” she pointed out.

Mrs. Kraus says her eyesight isn’t too good but so far that hasn’t hindered her in her crocheting. But she doesn’t care for television.

“My eyes are better than my ears,” she said, “so even if I can see the picture I don’t know what it is about because I can’t hear the conversation.”

No one ever sees Mrs. Kraus without her white hair neatly combed, rouge and powder on her face and wearing a pretty housedress, according to her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Clarence Kraus.

“Yes, I powder up a little bit,” confessed the peppy little woman who will be 90 years old today. “They say if you curry an old horse he’ll look better!”

Mrs. Kraus is looking forward to Sunday when she will be going back to the house where she lived the longest and most important part of her life and which is filled with memories, both happy and poignant.

With relatives and friends there to help her celebrate her ninetieth birthday the house will bring an experience which will provide her with another happy memory.

 

The Family Photo Album: Lucia Arras at Lincoln School, Findlay, 1928-1929

1928-29.JPG

This photo is of my grandmother, Lucia Marie Arras’s, class at Lincoln School in Findlay, Ohio.  It was taken in the spring of 1929.  Lucia is sitting just to the right (our right) of the teacher.

None of these children look particularly excited to be there.  There doesn’t appear to be any of the usual goofing off.  Not one child is looking elsewhere and laughing.  Perhaps the teacher was a stern one.

One of my favorite details is all the interesting patterned socks on the boys in the front row.  I wonder if they were purchased or if their mothers were such talented knitters.

It appears that a concrete block and a crate were used to prop up the first row bench.  A close-up of the crate reveals that it was from the Bourne-Fuller Company of Cleveland, Ohio.  Soon after this photo was taken, Bourne-Fuller would unite with two other companies, Central Alloy and Republic Iron and Steel, to become the third-largest steel company in the U.S.

bourne fuller and knee hole

Check out the boy on the left in the photo above.  Clearly, mothers in the 1920s also struggled to keep fabric over the knees of their sons!  My kids start back to school next week and this is what I expect to see at the end of most days.  The only thing missing is the grass stain.


Other photo posts from Lincoln School:
The Family Photo Album: Lucia Arras, 6th Grade Class Photo

The Family Photo Album: Lucia Arras, 6th Grade Class Photo

1934-35

This photo of my grandmother’s sixth grade class was taken at Lincoln school in Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio, in the spring of 1935.  The original school building was located (and still stands!) at 200 W. Lincoln Street, a mere two or three blocks from the Arras family’s home at 519 W. Lincoln.

Grandma, Lucia (Arras) Benington, would probably not thank me for pointing her out in this particular photograph.  She is, after all, the one person who blinked at the exact moment the picture was taken!

Lucia Arras 1934-35
Lucia Arras

I would just skip posting this photo, out of all the class photos in her collection, but there is something special about this one.  This is the only picture on the reverse of which she named every individual!  Thanks to her thoughtfulness, I can now (hopefully) identify most of the people in all the rest of the photos, with a little detective work.

1934-35 back

I imagine it might be a little difficult to read the writing from your computer screen, so here’s a transcription:

1st row–left to right: Jack Krout, Tommy Marshall, Glen Houes, Robert Brewer, Dick Cramar [Cramer]

2nd row–left to right: Betty Weitz, Dorthy [Dorothy] McCall, Marian Saller, Lucia Arras, Jean Taylor, Jane Bish, Virginia Rose, Maxine Sink, Ruth Cliner

3rd row–left to right: Donald Marvin, Betty Ex, Jeanne Anne Athey, Wayne Brewer, Tom Vosslor [Vossler], Mildred Saller, Arlene Strouse, Helena Oman, Rosalyn Rabkin

4th row–left to right: Robert Galnta, John Tabb, Mary Lou McFarland, Shirley Ann Quis, Mary Katherine Varner, Martha and Egen [Eugene] Cuningham [Cunningham], Bob Deyers, James Quinlan

Mrs Driesback


Other class photos from Lincoln School:
Lucia Arras: Lincoln School, Findlay, 1928-1929